Resections and Excisions

I have had a skin cancer removed by my surgeon. What will the histopathology doctor do with it?

Regular Process

Cancers, where possible, are surgically removed. The specimen (called a ‘resection’ or an ‘excision’) is sent to a histopathologist who will perform a number of tasks: (i) confirm the diagnosis of the prior biopsy (if performed), (ii) stage the cancer (i.e. determine how far it has spread, which guides subsequent therapy), and (iii) assess that the surgeon has fully removed it. This is a critical and time-consuming task for histopathologists that can take upwards of a week to complete. 

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    Specimen surgically removed
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    Sent to a histopathologist
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    Number of tasks done by histopathologist
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    Internationally formatted reports

4D Path Process

4D Path is working towards automating this complex workflow, offering reliable diagnosis, staging, and surgical margin clearances. This data will pre-populate reports which will become available to histopathologists before they start to assess the case. This will speed up reporting time and offer an automated backup second opinion. The benefits of this approach are faster turnaround times for patients, and reduced histopathologist workload and fatigue.

Automated
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    Specimen surgically removed
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    Send to 4D Path
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    Analysis
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    Internationally formated reports
Cancers, where possible, are surgically removed. This allows histopathologists to confirm (principally) the diagnosis of the prior biopsy (if performed), stage the cancer, and assess whether surgical resection margins are free of tumor. This is a critical and often time-consuming task. Clinical reports are typically formatted according to international guidelines. 4D Path is developing unique support in this regard, addressing diagnosis, staging, and the identification of key features such as lymphovascular invasion and surgical margin clearance. These data pre-populated reports are available to the histopathologist prior to assessing the case, thereby speeding up reporting time and effectively acting as a double reporting system. This will improve turnaround times for patients, reduce histopathologist workload and fatigue, and maximize diagnostic accuracy.